Richard Randolph Award

The Richard Randolph Award is an essay competition based on field or lab research. It has been named after Emeritus Professor Richard Randolph in recognition of his invaluable role as a founding member of the UCSC Anthropology Department and his leadership in starting the UCSC Anthropology Graduate Program. Open to UCSC archaeology, cultural, and physical anthropology graduate students.

This essay should be of publishable quality and follow the American Anthropologist guidelines. The award will be based on the overall quality, rigor, and originality of the work and on demonstration of effective field or lab practice. Essays will be peer-reviewed by the Richard Randolph Award Committee.


    2017

  • Kali Rubaii (First Prize)
    Living Sectarianism in and from Anbar Province, Iraq

    Lizzy Hare (Second Prize)
    If This, Then What?  Modeling Ecological Futures in the U.S. Midwest


  • 2016

  • Celina Callahan-Kapoor
    Living Without Diabetes in “Diabetesville, USA”: Knowing an Illness Through Proxies

  • 2015

  • Sarah Kelman
    Bumipreneurship in the Techno-Future: Contradictions and Paradoxes of Malaysia’s Startup Ecosystem

  • 2014

  • Nellie Chu
    Global Supply Chains of Desires and Risks: The Crafting of Migrant Entrepreneurship in Guangzhou, China


  • 2012

  • William Girard
    Enacting a Pentecostal Discourse of Development:
    Prosperity, Place, and the Holy Spirit in Zion Ministries

    Rosa Ficek
    Rutas Internas (Internal Routes)


  • 2011

  • No alternative textHeather Swanson
    Patterns of Naturecultures: The Redistribution of Pacific Salmon
  • No alternative textColin Hoag
    On the Importance of Time to the Anthropology of Bureaucracy: Between Prospection and Retrospection at the South African Department of Home Affairs

  • 2010

  • No alternative textBettina Stoetzer
    Tracking the Unheimlich at the Forest Edges of Berlin
  • No alternative textJason Rodriguez
    "Cleaning Up" Bodhgaya for Tourism Development

  • 2008

  • Jun Sunseri
    In Defense of Homescape and Hearth: Multi-scalar Identity Practices of an Indo-Hispanic Buffer Settlement in Spanish Colonial Northen New Mexico

Many of our graduates have received Wenner-Gren & Fullbright IIE Fellowships

See Also