Academic Requirements

Cultural Track | Archaeology Track | Biological Track

Independent Study | Intercampus Exchange | Masters Degree | Language Requirement

 


Both the Department and the University define the major requirements for each stage of study. The first year of the program is geared towards giving students a theoretical foundation so that they may begin to formulate ideas for a research project.  All graduate students are expected to be in residence (on campus) during their first year in the program. At the end of the first year, students will submit a portfolio of substantive work to their Preliminary Committee.

Residency Requirement

The minimum residency requirement for a Ph.D. degree at UCSC is six quarters. To receive a degree from UCSC, you must be registered at the Santa Cruz campus for at least three of the six quarters. A minimum of one quarter in residence is required between advancement to candidacy and the awarding of the degree.

Good Academic Standing and Probation

A duly registered graduate student is considered to be in good standing so long as the student's Department determines that he or she is making satisfactory progress toward a terminal degree. The Department and the Graduate Dean review the academic progress of each continuing graduate student annually.

If the Anthropology Department deems a student's work unsatisfactory, he or she may be placed on probation, or the Department may recommend immediate dismissal to the Graduate Dean. A student whose academic progress has been found unsatisfactory in two successive annual reviews will be subject to dismissal from the University.

Recommended probation for a student states:

  1. reason why (failed X class, etc.)
  2. steps the student must take to retore satisfactory academic standing
  3. the timeline for completion of the required work

The letter to the student will state that the failure to meet any one of the requirements may result in dismissal. No action for dismissal is taken until and unless the department recommends dismissal.

A student who has completed twelve or more quarters of full-time work in the same graduate program without Advancing to Candidacy for the Ph.D. is not considered to be making satisfactory progress.  In such cases, the student will be recommended for dismissal or placed on probation until Advancement is achieved.  A student Advanced to Candidacy for more than nine quarters who has yet to complete his or her Ph.D. is not considered to be making satisfactory academic progress. Consult the Graduate Divison's Graduate Student Handbook for more information about academic progress, probation, dismissal, and the appeal process.

Cultural

Requirements

Students are expected to have Advanced to Candidacy by the end of their third year. In order to advance to candidacy in Cultural Anthropology, students must complete:

  • Graduate Core Courses – ANTH 200A (fall) and ANTH 200B (winter). Note: Incompletes are not allowed in the Core Courses.

  • Ethnographic writing requirement

  • Three additional substantive graduate-level seminars in Anthropology.  This does not include Ethnographic Practice (ANTH 208A), Grant Writing (ANTH 228), Graduate Colloquium (ANTH 292), Independent Studies (ANTH 297 series), or tutorials.  Tutorials are courses taught in conjunction with undergraduate courses (ex. ANTH 146/246).
  • Survey of Cultural Anthropology (ANTH 252) if student comes from a non-anthropological background.  May also be fulfilled by TA'ing ANTH 152.

  • Language requirement

  • Pass the Qualifying Exam

Ethnographic Writing Requirement

This requirement may be completed by passing Ethnographic Practice (ANTH 208A) or through an independent research project in which the student engages in research based on participant observation or other ethnographic methodology, and in which the student adequately translates that research experience into a written text.

Checklist

First Year

Fall Quarter

  • Core Course (ANTH 200A)

  • Colloquia (ANTH 292)

  • Explore options for Preliminary Committee (your first-year advisor and one other faculty member)

Winter Quarter

  • Core Course (ANTH 200B)

  • Colloquia (ANTH 292)

  • Graduate Seminar or Language course (consult with your first-year advisor)

  • Survey of Cultural Anthropology (ANTH 252) if no background in anthropology

  • Apply for FLAS (Foreign Language Area Studies Fellowship)

Spring Quarter

  • Ethnographic Practice (ANTH 208A) or otherwise complete Ethnographic Writing Requirement in consultation with your first-year advisor.

  • Colloquia (ANTH 292)

  • Graduate Seminar or Language course (consult with your first-year advisor)

  • Apply for Summer Travel Funds

  • Submit request for TAships to department and Division of Graduate Studies (for TAships outside of the department)

  • Submit a portfolio of first-year work to Preliminary Committee and schedule First-Year Review

  • Select faculty advisor (this will be your advisor throughout your graduate career; however, you are allowed to change advisors)

Second Year

  • Write up reflective paper on summer fieldwork

  • Complete gradaute-level seminars

  • Continue to enroll in ANTH 292

  • Complete Grant Writing (ANTH 228) in Fall

  • Complete Constructing Regions (ANTH 229) in Winter

  • Write Regional/Area Statement for Qualifiying Exam

  • Complete Second-Year Review Form

    • Develop QE Committee

    • Begin writing QE statements

    • Make progress on the language requirement

  • Be enrolled in at least 10 units each quarter (speak to faculty advisor regarding which courses are best suited to your dissertation/academic objectives)
    • May enroll in elective seminars

    • May enroll in Independent Study courses

Third Year

  • Complete graduate-level seminars

  • Continue to enroll in ANTH 292

  • Complete QEs
    • Prospectus due in Fall

    • Topical statement due in Winter

    • Defense in Spring

  • Be enrolled in at least 10 units each quarter (speak to faculty advisor regarding which courses are best suited to your dissertation/academic objectives)
    • May enroll in elective seminars

    • May enroll in Independent Study courses

Post-QE (Fourth year and beyond)

  • Be enrolled in at least 5 units - 299A

Archaeology

The normal course of progress in the doctoral program in anthropology involves up to three years of increasingly specialized study before the Ph.D. Qualifying Examination, a field or lab based research project of variable length, and a year of dissertation writing. Students entering with Master's degrees may progress through the program more swiftly, depending upon the fit of prior work with the requirements of the doctoral program.

First-year students take a foundational course in the history of archaeological theory, another elective theory course, and pass a portfolio review of their year's work. They also participate in the departmental colloquia and proseminars, work closely with their faculty advisor to define methodological and regional foci of their curriculum, and to begin to develop their dissertation prospectus.

Requirements

  • Two Core Theory Courses (must complete during the first year):

    • ANTH 270A: History of Archaeological Theory
    • ANTH 270B: Current Directions in Archaeological Theory
  • Two Laboratory or Field Research Methods Courses, such as:

    • Skeletal Biology (ANTH 202A)
    • Ceramic Analysis (ANTH 280/L)
    • Osteology of Mammals, Birds, and Fish (ANTH 285)
    • Geographic Information Systems and Environmental Applications (ENVS 215A)
    • Courses in other departments with advisor approval
    • Approved laboratory or field research tutorial
    • Participation in an accredited field school
  • Two Geographic, Temporal, or Topical Area Courses, such as:

    • Seminar on Early African Archaeology (ANTH 275A)
    • Tutorial in Archaeology of African Complex Societies (ANTH 275B)
    • Advanced Topics in North American Archaeology (ANTH 276A)
    • Mesoamerican Archaeology (ANTH 276B)
    • Advanced Topics in Archaeology (ANTH 287)
    • Advanced Topics in Origins of Farming (ANTH 273)
    • Advanced Topics in Archaeology of Complex Societies (ANTH 274)
    • Constructing Regions (ANTH 229)
    • Courses in other departments with advisor approval
  • Quantitative Methods Requirement, to be determined by faculty advisor:

    • Pass approved statistics course taken outside the department (for example, PSYCH 2 or AMS 7).
    • Pass course in spatial modeling and statistics (ENVS 291 or AMS 245)
    • Approved quantitative methods or statistics course taken as part of previous BA or MA program may be substituted for this requirement.
  • Two Advanced Lab or Field Apprenticeships (ANTH 297/298) in consultation with your advisor (must complete by end of second year)
  • Two Graduate Seminars. Tutorials – courses taught in conjunction with undergraduate courses – do not count towards this requirement. Examples of appropriate courses include:
    • The Anthropology of Things: Sign, Gift, Commodity, Tool (ANTH 225)
    • Feminism and Gender in Archaeology (ANTH 279)
    • Household Archaeology (ANTH 282)
    • Indigenous Archaeology (ANTH 2XX)
    • Advanced Topics in Archaeology (ANTH 287)
  • Grant Writing (ANTH 228) or Research Design Seminar (ANTH 272)

  • Fulfill language requirement

Funding

  • Apply for FLAS (Foreign Language Area Studies Fellowship)

  • Apply for Summer Travel Funds

  • Apply for extramural funds (in consultation with your advisor)

  • Submit request for TAships to department and Division of Graduate Studies (for TAships outside of the department)

Checklist

First Year

  • Prepare Ford Foundation application (Fall)
  • ANTH 270A (Fall)
  • ANTH 270B (Winter)
  • Complete first-yer review (Spring)
    • Determine quantitative methods requirement
    • Determine language requirement
  • Prepare bibliography (~50 references) for first QE statement (summer)

Second Year

  • Prepare NSF GRFP and/or Ford Foundation application (Fall)
  • Submit QE statement bibliography to advisors (Fall)
  • Complete first QE statement using bibliography (Fall)
  • Prepare bibliography for second QE statement (Winter)
  • Develop second QE statement (Spring)
  • Prepare bibliography for third QE statement (summer)
  • Begin language requirement

Third Year

  • Develop third QE statement (Fall)
  • Take ANTH 272 (Advanced Archaeological Research Design) and develop QE prospectus and dissertation grant proposals (Fall)
  • Complete language requirement
  • Finalize QE statements and prospectus (Winter)
  • QE defense (Spring)

Biological

The Ph.D. program in physical anthropology combines a strong emphasis on hard and soft tissue anatomy with a broad evolutionary perspective. This highly selective track incorporates intense faculty mentoring of students, graduate involvement in instruction, as well as completion of course work and interdisciplinary training.

In their first year, students take two foundational theory courses and must pass a review of their work. In addition to courses, they participate in the departmental colloquia and proseminars and work closely with their faculty advisor to develop their dissertation prospect.

Students are expected to pass a first-year review and have advanced to candidacy by the end of their third year. In order to advance to candidacy in Biological Anthropology, students must complete:

  • Course Requirements (see below)
  • Attend at least 8 talks per quarter (Anthropology Colloquia series, Arch/BioAnth Lunch series, EEB Seminar series, or EPS Seminar series)
  • Comprehensive Exam (see below)
  • Two Quarters of Teaching Assistantships
  • Presentation of a Seminar on Proposed Research
  • Language Requirement
  • Pass the Qualifying Exam

Course Requirements

  • The Core Theory Corse - ANTH 295: Scientific Method (must complete during the first year)
  • Ecology and Evolutionary Theory Requirement (must complete during the first year)
  • Two Advanced Anthropological Methods and Research Courses
    • One course in the first year:
      • ANTH 202A: Human Skeletal Biology
      • ANTH 203: Forensics
      • ANTH 203B: Forensics and Bioarchaeology
      • ANTH 207A: Methods and Research in Molecular Anthropology
      • ANTH 207B: Methods and Research in Isotopic Analysis
    • One course by the end of the second year:
      • Any of the above
      • A course substituted from another department with approval from faculty advisor.
  • One Graduate Seminar in Archaeology or Cultural Anthropology (must be completed by the end of the second year)
  • One Course in Advanced Statistics or Quantitative or Computational Analysis
  • Two Lab Apprenticeships
  • ANTH 298
  • Equivalent course in another department
  • ANTH 294R: Advanced Readings in Biological Anthropology every quarter prior to advancing to candidacy
  • ANTH 216: Methods in Biological Anthropology every quarter starting in the second year until advancement to candidacy

Comprehensive Exam

By the end of the second year, students are required to pass a comprehensive exam. Students must demonstrate knowledge in Ecological and Evolutionary Theory, expertise in at least two subfields of Biological Anthropology, and sufficient background in either Archaeology or Cultural Anthropology, especially Medical or Environmental Anthropology. The exam format is a written essay and a 2-hour oral exam.

Students may satisfy both the oral and written requirement with a manuscript worthy of submission to a professional journal. The manuscript must be based on a research project undertaken in the second year with advisor approval. The student must be the first author of the manuscript in order to satisfy the requirement.

Checklist

First Year

  • ANTH 295: Scientific Method (Fall)
  • BIOE 279: Evolutionary Ecology (Winter)
  • ANTH 294R: Readings in Advanced Biological Anthropology (every quarter)
  • One course for Methods and Research Requirement
  • First-Year Review

 Second Year

  • Final course for Methods and Research Requirement
  • Archaeology or Cultural Anthropology Graduate Seminar
  • ANTH 294R: Readings in Advanced Biological Anthropology (every quarter)
  • ANTH 216: Methods in Biological Anthropology (every quarter)
  • Begin Language Requirement
  • Second-Year Review
  • Comprehensive Exam

Third Year 

  • Quantitative Requirement
  • Lab Apprenticeship Requirement
  • ANTH 294R: Readings in Advanced Biological Anthropology (every quarter)
  • ANTH 216: Methods in Biological Anthropology (every quarter)
  • Complete Language Requirement
  • Qualifying Exam

Funding

  • Apply for FLAS (Foreign Language Area Studies Fellowship)

  • Apply for Summer Travel Funds

  • Apply for extramural funds (in consultation with your advisor)

  • Submit request for TAships to department and Division of Graduate Studies (for TAships outside of the department)

Independent Study

Students may elect to register in an individual study/research course in anthropology in consultation with their faculty advisor.

To register in an independent study:

  1. Request an Anthropology Graduate Independent Study Petition from the Graduate Program Coordinator.
  2. Write an outline of the work you plan to do for the independent study. Be as precise about the bibliography and/or written work to be done as possible. Submit this with your petition to the Faculty Sponsor (faculty member who will be supervising the independent study).
  3. The faculty sponsor must sign the petition. If the faculty sponsor is not physically present, they may submit their approval by email.
  4. Completed petition must be submitted to the Graduate Program Coordinator within 5 days of the beginning of the quarter.
  5. The Graduate Program Coordinator will give you a Class Number so that you may enroll.

Submitting the Independent Study Petition does not complete the registration process. Students must register for the course on the MyUCSC portal.

Students may download the Anthropology Graduate Independent Study Petition at the following link: https://anthro.ucsc.edu/private/Forms/independent-study-petition.pdf

Intercampus Exchange

If students wish to take advantage of the educational opportunities available at another UC campus, students may become an intercampus exchange graduate student for one or more quarters. Additionally, students may take courses on more than one campus of the University during the same quarter.

To participate in the program, students must first obtain approval from their faculty adviser, the Dean of the Division of Graduate Studies at UC Santa Cruz, the department chairperson of the host campus, and the Dean of the Graduate Division on the host campus. Application forms are available at the Division of Graduate Studies and should be submitted three weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter for which exchange is requested. As the exchange is valid for only one quarter at a time, a new application form must be submitted for each term students wish to participate.

If a student enrolls the Spring Semester at UC Berkeley, he or she must file an application and pay registration fees both Winter and Spring quarters at UCSC.

Students can find the Application for the Intercampus Exchange Program for Graduate Students at: https://graddiv.ucsc.edu/current-students/pdfs/ICX2013-2.pdf 

Intercampus exchange students will register and pay all fees at the Santa Cruz campus. Use MyUCSC to enroll in courses offered by UCSC. Students must also contact the Registrar's Office on the host campus for course enrollment instruction. Since all campuses have advance enrollment, students will need to enroll in classes before the term begins on the host campus.

Application for Master's Degree

After students have passed their first-year review and completed 45 units of graduate study, they may apply for their Master of Arts in Anthropology.

The deadlines to submit your application for the degree for academic year 2017-18

Fall Quarter - October 13

Winter Quarter - January 19

Spring Quarter - April 13

Summer - July 6

Students may find applications online at: https://graddiv.ucsc.edu/current-students/pdfs/app_mas.pdf

Language Requirement

The foreign language requirement must be fulfilled before taking the Qualifying Exam.  A qualifying exam cannot be scheduled until the requirement has been met.

It is the responsibility of each graduate student to work with the Preliminary Committee to identify language competencies necessary for fieldwork and scholarship and to initiate study toward meeting these needs. To meet the language requirement, competence in one language must be formally demonstrated. Each student's advisor will recommend how this requirement should be met, as well as what additional skills should be sought. Generally accepted ways of meeting the language requirement include:

  • Passing a standardized test at a predetermined level

  • Taking and passing a translation exam administered by an appropriate member of the UCSC faculty or an outside assessor approved by the advisor

  • Taking and passing a series of language courses at a specified advanced level at UCSC or elsewhere, again, to be determined in consultation with the advisor

In some cases, the language in which a relevant scholarly literature exists will be the logical language of examination. In other cases the language in which fieldwork will be conducted will be the most logical language for examination.

In the case of non-native English speakers who plan to undertake research in their own native language, English can meet the foreign language requirement. In the case of English native speakers who plan to do research in their native language, the requirement should be met by another language relevant to the field research or scholarly resources.

The Report on Language Requirement Form can be found at https://graddiv.ucsc.edu/current-students/pdfs/language.pdf and must be signed by the Graduate Director, indicating the language chosen and the means for demonstrating competence.